Minnesota is known for our lakes, which you hopefully utilized all summer long, and for our cold winters. With the summer winding down, snowbirds are prepping to head to their secondary locations for the winter months. That said, there is still plenty of summer left and, trust us, you don’t want to miss a Minnesota autumn. If you’re unsure of what to do as the days get shorter and the weather cools, here are some ideas:

 

Festivals and Fairs

Just because the summer is coming to a close doesn’t mean the Minnesota fun has to stop. There are plenty of festivals and fairs that take place during the treasured last few weeks of summer.

  • The Minnesota Renaissance Festival

 

This beloved Minnesota event goes from August 18th through September 30th. Visitors don’t have to dress in costume (but it’s definitely encouraged!) as they step back into a 16th Century European village. You’ll enjoy shopping, view live jousting, and interact with hundreds of characters as you spend your day feasting on turkey legs and beer. It’s truly a sight to see and an event you don’t want to miss!

 

  • The Minnesota State Fair

 

The Great Minnesota Get-Together, as it’s lovingly referred to, runs from August 23rd through September 3rd. Stroll through the fairgrounds and take in exhibits, livestock shows, shopping, music, vendors, and of course, all the food on a stick you can stomach! If you’re from the Midwest, you’ll recognize the ever-popular Tater Tot Hotdish, but with a State Fair twist: on a stick!

 

 

 

Sporting Events

If you’re not interested in fried foods and jousting, you might enjoy attending some sporting events as we transition into autumn. The new U.S. Bank Stadium hosts the Minnesota Vikings and is sure to be a great time. The Minnesota Twins continue their baseball season well into September and the Timberwolves and Lynx begin their seasons in October.

 

 

Apples, Pumpkins, and Corn Mazes. Oh My!

Visit any one of the beautiful and delicious apple orchards scattered across Minnesota. Whether you’re interested in heading to the Metro or traveling up north, you’re sure to find an apple orchard to visit! September 13th through the 16th is Applefest, the annual apple festival in the southern part of the state. Of course, you can’t think Minnesota apples without mentioning the Honeycrisp apple. Cultivated at the University of Minnesota, these delicious apples are sweet, firm, and best for eating raw.

 

You can go to pumpkin patches and find the perfect Halloween pumpkin. Many pumpkin patches also have interactive corn mazes that are fun for the whole family! Most open up around Mid-September. October 20th is the Pumpkin Fest, a free event with plenty to see and do.

 

As summer days fade into autumn evenings, snowbirds can still find plenty of activities to enjoy well before the snow falls.

Retired friends often ask one another, “What are you up to tomorrow?”  For many, crafting, movie-going, and visits with treasured grandchildren are on the list.  And, for more and more retirees, volunteering is also on the list.  Volunteering is a means of philanthropy that is among the most highly valued by charitable organizations.

Research continues to reveal the win/win nature of volunteerism as it provides tremendous benefits for both the volunteer and the receiving organization.  In 2017 alone, volunteers gave the equivalent of $184 billion dollars with their gifts of time.  Although retirees make up only 31% of the adult U.S. population, they account for 45% of all the hours volunteered annually.

 

Moving from a life structured around work to the non-structured life of retirement can be daunting.  Social isolation and boredom can result in reduced physical activity and depression.  Regularly volunteering can provide structure, a way to meet and engage with others, and opportunities to use long-honed skills or, to learn new ones.  Even winter visitors (otherwise known as snowbirds) are volunteering because this is one of fastest ways to meet people who like and value the same things.

 

Research continues to reveal that seniors who volunteer have lower rates of depression, lower blood pressure and lower mortality rates.  Depending upon the opportunity, volunteering can even be a way for seniors to share important life lessons with younger generations.  Retirement is a hard-earned phase of life and should be an enjoyable and active time.  Volunteering can make a significant difference in the health and wellness of retirees.  It truly is the gift that keeps on giving.

 

To learn more about volunteer senior opportunities in Minnesota, visit http://www.mnseniorcorps.org/volunteering/how/rsvp.aspx