As the warm weather begins to wane, many snowbirds begin preparing, at least mentally, to head to the Sunbelt state of their choosing. For others, being home for the spring and summer around friends and family makes it hard to want to leave. You don’t want to miss the beauty and reverence of a crisp autumn morning; you don’t want to miss spending the holidays with your family; you definitely don’t want to be here when the snow starts to fall. That begs the question: when is the right time to fly south for the winter? As they say, timing is everything, so how do you know when that timing is right?

 

Honestly, that question is really about personal preference, but there are a couple things you might want to consider.

 

 

Location:

Yes, you’re trading in snow boots and mittens for flip flops and sunglasses, but that doesn’t mean there aren’t particular patterns of weather where you’re going that need to be looked into. For example, in Florida, November has the lowest amount of rainfall so that might be a perfect time to head south. The beaches are usually the least populated during the late fall as well. You’ll be able to settle in before tourists arrive.

 

 

 

Method of Travel:

 

Many snowbirds choose to either rent or own a home in both states in which they reside. This makes it easier to readjust to either location. The packing and unpacking is less intensive, there are many cost-effective living options that are designated for dual living, and you won’t have to worry about cross-country travel accommodations. Considering airfare and finding the best prices can impact the time someone might leave.

Bidding farewell to a seasonal property is an annual ritual met with differing emotions by countless people. The cooling weather and falling leaves are almost like an alarm clock, signaling the end of summer. If you’re a snowbird, the end of summer means it’s time to close up your seasonal home and head south for the winter. Whether you’re renting out your seasonal home or you are shutting it down until spring, there is a lot of work to be done. That list of chores can seem pretty hefty, especially if all your focus is on the desert air you’re soon to be breathing. Here is a list that should prove to be a great start at buttoning up your seasonal home:

 

First, it’s helpful to break the chores into categories. Start with the outside work as fall weather can be unpredictable. Obviously, everyone’s list will look a little different, but this should help get you started and organized:

 

  • Clean and store boats, lawn ornaments, deck furniture
  • Clean and winterize any gas-powered yard equipment
  • Store fire pit, empty flower pots, drain hoses and sprinklers
  • Rake and remove leaves as well as possible
  • Look for air leaks around wiring and the like
  • Drain water lines to prevent freezing
  • Consider setting up an alarm or home security system

 

 

 

The indoor list is a little less strenuous, but requires a keen attention to detail:

 

  • Turn off all non-essential utilities
  • Dispose of trash and pack or donate unwanted foods
  • Unplug appliances and electronics
  • If necessary, notify the homeowners association of the vacant property
  • Arrange for mail-forwarding and stop any newspaper delivery
  • Strip beds to let mattresses air out
  • Vacuum carpets and floors to ensure that no food crumbs are left to attract vermin
  • Thoroughly scrub, dust, mop, and wash the interior of the house. It’ll collect plenty of dust over the winter, no use in storing the dirt until next summer!
  • Cover furniture with tarps/plastic to protect in the event of a roof leak
  • Organize and arrange for the shipment of any boxes that you plan on bringing with you

 

 

The most important thing to remember is that you’re not going to another planet, you’ll have the opportunity to buy anything you forgot when you arrive at your winter home. That is, unless you are going to a different planet, in which case, we can’t wait to hear about it next summer! Safe travels!